Drugged-Up Clubber Suddenly Realizes She’s In Church Worship Service

club-696x394AUSTIN, TX—After a 12-hour, drug-fueled night of club hopping, local party girl Jenny Wilson suddenly came down off her high to realize she was just in the middle of a local church’s worship set Sunday morning.

According to sources, at around 8 a.m. Wilson had told an Uber driver to take her to The Gathering, a dance club downtown—but the driver instead dropped her off at a church with the same name, which was just beginning its early service. As Wilson saw the fog billowing out of the sanctuary and the laser lights dancing around the room, she figured she was in the right place and began getting her dance on. Continue reading

Pokémon Go: Into the real world, with real crime

The game is getting its players off the couch, which already wasn’t safe from the bad guys

Pokémon Go sneaked up on me. One minute, I knew nothing about it, and the next, just about everyone was talking about it.

The twist with Pokémon Go is that players can catch Pokémon in real life, out on the streets and away from their couches. I love the idea that a smartphone game not only can be played anywhere, but actually requires its players to get outside. But because security is always on my mind, I quickly wondered what crimes Pokémon Go would enable. The answer wasn’t long in coming.

Criminals are quick to exploit new opportunities, and they have been targeting video gamers for a long time. Many games encourage in-app purchases, and they often allow players to trade tokens with other players. That creates an incentive for criminals to get their hands on people’s tokens, which they can then sell for financial gain. One major online gaming company hired me to strengthen its user authentication mechanisms, since criminals had been using social engineering to get help desk employees to reset passwords, thus granting them access to players’ in-app assets.  Continue reading…

Tattoos for Jesus? Group Raises Funds for ‘Church Plant’ by Tattooing Members, Sampling Booze

TEMPE, Ariz. — A group in Arizona that identifies itself as being under the banner of Reformed Christianity recently raised funds for a church plant in Hawaii by offering tattoos and hosting a Bible conference featuring a beer flight.

Apologia Studios, led by Marcus Pittman, which is a part of Apologia Church, led by Jeff Durbin, is behind the fundraising effort to plant a new church in Kauai. Continue reading